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The Homeless Crisis Could Soon Be An Epidemic
#1
Fascinating article about the homelessness crisis in liberal West Coast Metropolitan cities like San Francisco.  I try to keep my eyes open, and the nightmare reality described here is not too far off for many parts of the West in my opinion.

You can read the full article here.  I warn you, it's not pretty reading. 

When the next downturn hits, the march towards Brazillian cities with gated communities will continue.  I think it's time we started having meetups on this forum.


Quote:[b]Doug Casey[/b]: Cleaning up after these people isn’t a solution. It’s cosmetic, at best.
What we have are thousands on the streets who produce nothing, and only consume. They survive on food stamps, various welfare programs, handouts, petty theft, and the like. In other words, they’re not an asset either to themselves or to society. They’re an active liability, and they’re actually encouraged by being allowed to group together on other people’s property.
Will cleaning up after them solve the problem? No, it aggravates it.
It’s now an epidemic. It started in 2008 when lots of middle-class people lost their houses. And oddly, the trend toward people living on the street has been growing over the last 10 years of artificial boom.
We’re going to have a very real bust very soon. The high levels of debt that we have today have allowed the whole country to live above its means. When the economy adjusts to lower levels of consumption, a new avalanche of people will lose their jobs, and they’ll have no savings to fall back on. However, their debts will remain and keep them from getting back up.
Not so long ago, Americans saved up and bought their cars for cash. Your car was a small asset, but it was an asset. Then came two-year, then three-year, five-year, and now seven-year financing. In fact, most now lease their cars, because they can’t afford to buy them, even with seven-year financing. The things have gone from being a small asset into a major liability. With simple pickup trucks selling for upwards of $50,000, many are going to lose their transportation. Then they can’t get to their job, can’t pay their rent or mortgage, and they’re out on the street. It’s easy to see how an ex-member of the middle class could become mentally unbalanced and start doing drugs.
People could lose houses they bought with mortgages they can’t afford but think they can because of today’s very low floating interest rates. Just like back in 2008 and 2009. Plus, real estate taxes keep going up—partly because local governments are in good measure responsible for supporting lowlifes forced to live on the street, ironically due to high real estate taxes.
Utilities are going to go up because commodities are very, very low now. They’re going higher—good for commodity speculators; not good for Joe and Jane Consumer.
So, you’re going to see more people moving onto the streets. And let me reemphasize this: They’re not—now—necessarily junkies or mentally disabled. But they may be, once they lose everything they thought they had. Their numbers are going to grow as the economy goes downhill.
This is an explosive problem. These are people who will have nothing to lose. They’re going to be overcome by envy of and resentment against the rich. You can count on them to vote Democratic in 2020. There’s no question the state of the economy will be by far the biggest influence in the election.
All the while, because of the financialization of the economy, the rich are getting richer. This isn’t just unfair—it’s dangerous. Incidentally, “unfair” is a word I hate to use, because it often implies a whole set of assumptions. But that’s another topic. Anyway, the situation is setting up the United States for class warfare, the haves against the have-nots. Middle class societies are stable; we’re becoming less middle class.
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#2
San Francisco is one of the most expensive cities in the United States and California is one of the most expensive states. In response, liberal politicians try implementing rent control. However this makes the problem of housing affordability worse, not better. The part of the article that spoke the most to me was this:


Quote:[b]Doug Casey: [/b]Rent control, like other forms of wage and price controls, seems logical to someone who doesn’t understand economics. It always sounds good to politicians—they like “bold action” to keep prices down, appear to help the little guy, and punish rich landlords all at once. What’s not to like?
In addition to their crime of initiating force, stealing, and destroying the moral tenor of society, they’re looking only at the immediate and direct consequences, not the delayed and indirect ones. Namely that nobody will build new buildings or even maintain old ones if they can’t make money doing so.


I think this hit the problems of rent control that liberals love so much: it makes housing less affordable because developers won't build as much housing since they make less money.

So what's the best way of addressing the rising cost of housing? Reducing regulations since it encourages developers to build more much needed housing:

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/rent-control/
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#3
(11-16-2019, 08:30 PM)Lufiend Wrote: San Francisco is one of the most expensive cities in the United States and California is one of the most expensive states. In response, liberal politicians try implementing rent control. However this makes the problem of housing affordability worse, not better. The part of the article that spoke the most to me was this:


Quote:[b]Doug Casey: [/b]Rent control, like other forms of wage and price controls, seems logical to someone who doesn’t understand economics. It always sounds good to politicians—they like “bold action” to keep prices down, appear to help the little guy, and punish rich landlords all at once. What’s not to like?
In addition to their crime of initiating force, stealing, and destroying the moral tenor of society, they’re looking only at the immediate and direct consequences, not the delayed and indirect ones. Namely that nobody will build new buildings or even maintain old ones if they can’t make money doing so.


I think this hit the problems of rent control that liberals love so much: it makes housing less affordable because developers won't build as much housing since they make less money.

So what's the best way of addressing the rising cost of housing? Reducing regulations since it encourages developers to build more much needed housing:

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/rent-control/

Interesting point my friend.  I'd be interested to know form other forum members what the house prices are like where they live.  Have they been going up, down, stayed the same?
In the UK they only ever seem to go up...Until there is a crash, and then they don't.  Wink Smile
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#4
Interesting case study on why Paris is so expensive (hint: some kind of regulations/restrictions):



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#5
Sobering but fascinating doumentary about homelessness in the USA



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#6
I'd say the answer to a lot of those problems (but not all) is to move. 

San Diego and California are some of the most expensive places in the country. A salary that would make you homeless there would get you an apartment in cheaper areas of the country. Sure they won't have the sun and beaches of Southern California, but beggars can't be choosers. Plenty of people move for monetary reasons, so can they.

Virginia (named after Queen Elizabeth I) is state with strict tenant laws in a region (the South) known for strict tenant laws in the whole country. If landlords won't rent to you because of strict state laws, then it's time to move to a state that has more lax tenant laws.

Appalachia has been hard hit with the coal industry slowing down. You have to move to those places with jobs. The Scotch-Irish have deep roots there, but having a job that pays the bills is more important. 



Side note, seeing all the folks sleeping in their cars reminded me of the daygamer who voluntarily lives in a van in New York City. This guy was so devoted to daygame that in order to free up more time to daygame he cut his expenses by giving up his apartment and living in a van which then allowed him to cut his work hours. Now that is dedication to daygame. 

Call me old fashioned, but I like having a bathroom...
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#7
(12-01-2019, 07:20 AM)Lufiend Wrote: I'd say the answer to a lot of those problems (but not all) is to move. 

San Diego and California are some of the most expensive places in the country. A salary that would make you homeless there would get you an apartment in cheaper areas of the country. Sure they won't have the sun and beaches of Southern California, but beggars can't be choosers. Plenty of people move for monetary reasons, so can they.

Virginia (named after Queen Elizabeth I) is state with strict tenant laws in a region (the South) known for strict tenant laws in the whole country. If landlords won't rent to you because of strict state laws, then it's time to move to a state that has more lax tenant laws.

Appalachia has been hard hit with the coal industry slowing down. You have to move to those places with jobs. The Scotch-Irish have deep roots there, but having a job that pays the bills is more important. 



Side note, seeing all the folks sleeping in their cars reminded me of the daygamer who voluntarily lives in a van in New York City. This guy was so devoted to daygame that in order to free up more time to daygame he cut his expenses by giving up his apartment and living in a van which then allowed him to cut his work hours. Now that is dedication to daygame. 

Call me old fashioned, but I like having a bathroom...
I doubt the reason was a devotion do daygame...I guess the salient part of that sentence was "cut his expenses".

You shouldn't need to be so militant about it though.  If you're actually out talking to girls then it shouldn't take up that much time.
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#8
Bad laws cause homelessness. This video shows that bad laws restrict and frustrate developers who give up on building much needed housing in crowded San Francisco. This causes a housing shortage, high rents, and more homelessness.



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#9
(12-05-2019, 02:47 AM)Lufiend Wrote: Bad laws cause homelessness. This video shows that bad laws restrict and frustrate developers who give up on building much needed housing in crowded San Francisco. This causes a housing shortage, high rents, and more homelessness.




Some parts of California have already collapsed into filth, squalor and decay.  It will be interesting to see what the next couple of years brings.
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#10
There are the truly homeless. And then there are the "professional bums" who are beg by choice and refuse to do other work:



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#11
I'm elated that the Trump administration's Secretary Ben Carson gets it when it comes to housing, as opposed to the clueless and disastrous Obama administration:


Quote:The Trump administration is moving away from the overreach of the Obama era.
...

[Trump's Housing and Urban Development] Secretary Ben Carson appears to understand that small homes on small lots—even if bunched together in lower-income neighborhoods—tend to be affordable, even without subsidies. And, like one of his HUD predecessors, Jack Kemp, Carson reminds us that local regulatory barriers can push up housing costs and depress new supply.


https://www.city-journal.org/trump-fair-housing
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#12
I used to live in Bristol in the UK a few years ago and it was great, cheap, nice people, rent not crazy and a city centre with some cool independent shops.

Now it's INSANELY expensive and full of London cunts and property speculators. I'ts unrecognisable from about 6 or 7 years ago.

I move around constantly, so i'm not wed to 1 place, but it was a shame when Bristol becomes a wank stain... I actually quite liked that place!
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#13
(01-04-2020, 08:37 AM)Reformation1 Wrote: I used to live in Bristol in the UK a few years ago and it was great, cheap, nice people, rent not crazy and a city centre with some cool independent shops.

Now it's INSANELY expensive and full of London cunts and property speculators.  I'ts unrecognisable from about 6 or 7 years ago.

I move around constantly, so i'm not wed to 1 place, but it was a shame when Bristol becomes a wank stain... I actually quite liked that place!
Intredasting mate, didn't know that.

The property market in the UK is insane, with full support from the UK government!   As you say, it ruins the character of the area.  

Would I think differently if I owned property there? I'd be grateful but no, I wouldn't.  It ruins places, just as Airbnb has in some parts of Spain.  If I was a local I certainly wouldn't want tons of wide British cunts coming over stinking the place up...Nor Polish or Russian.  

I'm an old curmudgeon though and find the vast majority of people highly irritating and can barely stand to be around them  Big Grin Tongue
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#14
(01-04-2020, 09:00 AM)SteveJabba Wrote:
(01-04-2020, 08:37 AM)Reformation1 Wrote: I used to live in Bristol in the UK a few years ago and it was great, cheap, nice people, rent not crazy and a city centre with some cool independent shops.

Now it's INSANELY expensive and full of London cunts and property speculators.  I'ts unrecognisable from about 6 or 7 years ago.

I move around constantly, so i'm not wed to 1 place, but it was a shame when Bristol becomes a wank stain... I actually quite liked that place!
Intredasting mate, didn't know that.

The property market in the UK is insane, with full support from the UK government!   As you say, it ruins the character of the area.  

Would I think differently if I owned property there? I'd be grateful but no, I wouldn't.  It ruins places, just as Airbnb has in some parts of Spain.  If I was a local I certainly wouldn't want tons of wide British cunts coming over stinking the place up...Nor Polish or Russian.  

I'm an old curmudgeon though and find the vast majority of people highly irritating and can barely stand to be around them  Big Grin Tongue
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#15
No idea why my reply didn't show... *sigh*
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