Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
AMA: The Living In Poland Thread
#1
I originally posted this on another forum I read - but thought it might be interesting for some of the readers here also. If any one is interested in what life is like in Poland for the expat then here are my experiences after living here for the past two years, feel free to AMA. Incidentally it was during a 6 month euro/work jaunt [possible faggot term?] with Steve that I was first introduced to Poland - so Steve is kinda responsible for me being here.
[Steve I kept this separate from your other Poland thread - cos this one is less about game - and cos google likes threads Wink ]


Here are some of my experiences in case anyone is considering moving here too - this is of course anecdotal:

1. If you are self employed [ie work online] tax is a flat 19% of profits - compare than to the money grabbers in the UK. You also have to pay a fixed fee for health/pensions/social security which is at a reduced rate for the first two years - it costs me around $142 a month right now at the reduced rate, this will double when the full rate kicks in. This covers all your healthcare and some other benefits.

2. You will probably want to get private healthcare on top of this which covers top end diagnostics, day surgery, dental etc and costs about $40 per month. This tends to cut out waiting lists - but not always.

3. The main city centers and university areas are poz central - but this disappears to nothing the further out you get. The average Pole does not like gays, abortion, believes in traditional roles, and will usually attend church many times a year.

4. Your traditional Catholic mass on a Sunday is standing room only - and they are building churches all over the place - and not small ones. People put on smarter clothes, take their children, and have respect for the Church. Some more rural towns will often have many Catholic churches, not just one big one.

5. There are babies everywhere. We have a joke: An Englishman returns from a Ryanair trip to Gdansk, his friends ask how it was, he says 'Good beer, vodka, food, but I was weirded out the whole time'. 'Why was that?' ask his friends. His face looks puzzled as he says 'There were these strange bald albino midgets everywhere I went!!!!'. A Polish builder overhears this and mutters under his breath 'Kurwa! They are called white babies'.

6. Many Polish women are highly capable, educated, beautiful, and geared toward being mothers. Its a great place to start a family - my first boy arrives this week [edit: he is now 2 months old] - so I have skin in the game. There is of course a special type of psychotic polish woman who should be avoided at all costs - but that's true in all countries, covered in tats, pussy hat wearing, feminist/lgbtq supporter types, artificial lips type women are to be avoided here. Polish women are generally friendly, warm, easy to approach - and their sole expectation is that you act like a man not a faggy little girl or a boorish beer-soaked expat.

7. The Polish can appear grumpy and unfriendly at first look - but after a couple of minutes of talking [compliment their country - that's universally welcomed] they really warm up. I've had some amazing adventures here thanks to Polish friends I've made along the way.

8. I've never seen a burqua here, and there are almost zero muslims - apart from next to the novotel in Warsaw. Similarly once you are outside of the immediate city centers you wont see anyone other than white people for weeks on end. Poland is a monoculture and that's what makes it safe and reliable.

9. One year rentals cost about half of AirBNBs, Public transport is highly modern and reliable - so if you rent outside of the immediate city center you can make massive savings. A nice place can often be had for $500 a month or less. My 3 bedroom house with a garden in a private community costs around $1000. If you are out late taxis/uber/bolt are also incredibly cheap - a 30 minute bolt ride regularly costs me $6.50.

10. Internet is highly available and cheap - 1gb connections seem to be the norm now and you can get them for $25 a month. Similarly mobile connections are incredibly cheap.

11. Avoid clip joints [dodgy all you can drink strip clubs], dont be disrespectful to the country or flag, dont take drugs or drink drive, dont get overly boisterous, show the women respect [they are nearly always super friendly and polite] and you are very unlikely to ever have a problem with the locals - its a *very* safe country.

12. House parties and bbqs at country retreats are the key to socializing - the bar scene is not stocked with your average Polish person.

13. Dealing with official matters is easy enough here - get a PESEL number [personal id number], with that sort out your ePAUP [digital identity] and then you can do pretty much everything directly online. There are loads of guides to this online.

14. Its a big ass country by European standards so go see the baltic sea coast, check out the mountains in the south, and visit as many cities as you can - they are all different and full of cultural things to enjoy. Train travel is high class, fast and cheap - but driving is also a great option here, the place is primed for road trips.

Highly recommended. AMA
Reply
#2
Its always good to know that your country is liked by foreginers.
We always underestimate ourselves. This is our national feature Wink

You are pretty accurate in all what you mentioned. Obviously my subjective opinion is a bit different but it’s due I’ve put myself a bit out of society, and I’m polish so I have a natural view from inside.

But let me ask you what was the most difficult challenge you have to manege in moving and living in Poland as a foreigner? Exept language off course.
constant is change...
Reply
#3
(12-01-2019, 10:42 PM)Tigero Wrote: Its always good to know that your country is liked by foreginers.
We always underestimate ourselves. This is our national feature Wink

You are pretty accurate in all what you mentioned. Obviously my subjective opinion is a bit different but it’s due I’ve put myself a bit out of society, and I’m polish so I have a natural view from inside.

But let me ask you what was the most difficult challenge you have to manege in moving and living in Poland as a foreigner? Exept language off course.

Ive lived in quite a few other countries so I didn't face any of the first time expat issues that some people may have to deal with.

Nothing has really been that difficult in Poland. As you say the language makes dealing with official stuff a bit more annoying than it needs to be and there is far too many bits of paper/offices/things to be stamped - but that's a problem in nearly all of Europe.

Poland is the easiest place I've ever lived to be honest - its even easier than moving to London as a Brit for the first time [council tax/congestion charge/parking/personal safety/real estate wankers/credit checks/entire day check-in processes etc etc]. 

Protip for any foreigner moving to Poland - get on Tinder and OkStupid and meet some Polkas - then freindzone them. They are super great from that point on at inviting you to things, helping you with official tasks, and even delivering food and supplies to your apartment. I cannot speak highly enough of just how nice and caring the Polish female is.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
  The Grand Poland Thread SteveJabba 10 534 11-30-2019, 05:17 PM
Last Post: 99percentile
  The Small Colombia Thread Bardi 3 362 10-20-2019, 07:34 AM
Last Post: Bardi



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

              Quick Links

              User Links